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Thread: Two Golden Eggs.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    29

    Smile Two Golden Eggs.

    2/14/08 I just joined a few day's ago . I have a number of beautiful glass pieces that I have bought over the years. I would now like to sell off a few items, but I am not sure of the Artist or the fair market value of these pieces of art. I would appreciate any help given.
    I bought these pieces in the mid 80,s from PAULY & Co in Venice Italy. The small "Gold" egg is 3 3/8" high X2 1/4" Width and 12.6oz. weight.
    The larger "Gold" egg is 3 5/8" high X 2 1/4" width. and 13oz. weight.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    311

    Default Murano Egg

    Hi jaffelarry! I don't have much in the way of assistance, but wanted to reply, so you didn't feel that your post was ignored. The eggs are gorgeous, and obviously very well made. I'm assuming they do not have any markings or labels that would be of any help. Murano made after the 70's can be difficult to attribute, there isn't too much in the way of literature, the only possible aid would most likely be auction listings. Is Pauly&Co still in business? They may be able to assist?
    ----Tina----

  3. #3
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    Feb 2008
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    Tina:
    Thank you for you're assistance, I found a site Pauly & C. but no information on the value of there glass. I have other pieces I will be posting in the near future also from Pauly.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Birmingham, AL, USA
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    Default

    Pauly & Co is an unusual company. I checked Carl Gable's book Murano Magic to get the scoop on them. Murano Magic has the history of many of the Murano companies.

    When it started out in 1902, Pauly & Co primarily marketed the glass of other Murano companies, e.g. Salviati, and made a few of its own pieces. In 1919 a Milan company bought Pauly & Co, along with CVM. Later in 1920, Pauly and CVM were sold and products of both companies were often marketed as CVM. Pauly & Co started making its own glass in 1925. In 1963, Pauly and CVM was sold again to Luciano Barbon. Apparently it was still in operation when the book was written (c 2004).

    When I see a Pauly label, I am never certain how to interpret it. Your pieces seem to be new pieces. By that I mean mid-20th century or later. Four of the glassblowers the book mentions for Pauly are Eduino Ferro, Ennio Compagno, Umberto Bellotto, and Giuseppe Ferro. I am sure there were probably others in the long history of the company.

    I hope this helps some,
    Anita

  5. #5
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    Default

    I checked a little more on the glassmakers. Bellotto only worked for Pauly in 1927 before leaving glassmaking in 1928. Compagno made the Salviati-style glass for CVM -- the type with thin glass, fish, swans, and other figures. Eduino Ferro, interestingly enough, is Mario Gambaro's (of Gambaro & Poggi) great-grandfather.

    There is no mention of who worked at Pauly in more modern times. I couldn't find anything on the web in a fast search. It is a good company with well regarded products. I don't know the value of the eggs -- sorry -- but maybe you can find something with a little more searching.

    Anita

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Default

    Anita:
    You seem to be very knowledgeable about classwork's. Can you tell me more about how the clear glass is formed around the gold ball and how there are no bubbles in the crystal? Also would you know if the ball is gold.
    Thank you for the work you have done on my behalf.
    Larry

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Default

    Larry, the egg appears to be a sommerso egg. Sommerso vessels have two or more layers of glass with different colors or textures. It looks like a vase inside a vase. The gold looks like gold foil. This is layered on the outside of molten glass before the glass is blown.

    I don't know a lot about the glassworks. I have to depend on books to dig up the information. Pauly has had a history with many changes, but they have kept going. I wish we knew more about who worked with them in later years.

    Anita

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Anita, I appreciate the help you have been.
    Thank you,
    Larry

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